________________________________________________

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

APRIL 7, 2000

ANSWERING THE CONTROVERSIAL DNA OWNERSHIP QUESTION:

CANADIAN ATTEMPTS TO TRADEMARK HIS OWN GENES

Vancouver, B.C. - In what may be the first human attempt to trademark personal DNA, a Canadian has formally filed an application with the United States Trademark and Patent office. On the eve of the four-day Human Genome Project 2000 meeting held in Vancouver, futurist Frank Ogden raised the controversial question about ownership of DNA.

"I've decided to answer the ownership question, I own my DNA," says Ogden, "I don't like the idea of other people deciding who owns my DNA, so I'm doing this to protect myself and my unique identity." 

"The misuse of genetic research and knowledge will be one of the great social and ethical issues to face science and society," says Ogden, "I expect trademark applications will be a growing trend as people try to protect themselves."

"This is an innovative and creative use of the United States Patent and Trademark Office's Federal Trademark System," says Mike Hughes, trademark lawyer at Hughes & Schacht. "It will take Washington several months to study and advise if this is application can proceed."

Ogden, a.k.a. Dr. Tomorrow is a best-selling author, international speaker and futurist. The trademark would protect against the use of Ogden's DNA gene sequence for reproduction including the production of humans, clones, survival machines, or futuristic animals. 

-30-
   
Trademark Application   and   Legal Response

 For further information, please contact:



Ruby Ng
Contemporary Communications Ltd.
Tel: (604) 734-3663 ext. 312
Cel: (604) 880-3891
E-mail: rng@ccpr.com
Mike Hughes
Hughes & Schacht
Tel: (360) 647-1296
E-mail:mikeh@inventionlaw.com